Jack and Jill went up the hill and broke his crown

This is the final version that was turned in, mounted on black board. There are some changes that need to be made, primarily that the bottom of the hill needs to be stretched down into the foreground and cropped so it’s not just floating above the bottom of the square. Some text needs to be moved around and the instructor would like more depth. I got a B but I can make changes to bump it up to an A. I’ll get around to that eventually.

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Bernhard

Although I haven’t posted my finished work for Jack & Jill & Fool on the Hill (it’s forthcoming), I need to continue to move forward. My current work is a news headline in the style of Lucian Bernhard.

Via Wikipedia, I learned that Bernhard was a “German graphic designer…through the first half of the 20th century…”

He was influential in helping create the design style known as Plakatstil (Poster Style), which used reductive imagery and flat-color as well as Sachplakat (‘object poster’) which restricted the image to simply the object being advertised and the brand name. He was also known for his designs for Stiller shoes, Manoli cigarettes, and Priester matches.

Here, an example of his work for Manoli (in 1910-11):

And here, an example of his work for Stiller shoes (in 1908):

Wikipedia lists several typfaces that will be invaluable to me in the process of emulating Bernhard’s work.

Typeface will be executed in illustrator, while imagery will be arranged in photoshop. Ideally, I’d like to be able to vector the primary image that I choose to use in the poster in illustrator, as Bernhard’s style lends well to that, but we’ll see how it goes. My skills in Illustrator are sorely lacking.

The piece must contain a headline from a newspaper (current event) and then, of course, imagery to match, but all must be rendered in Bernhard’s style.

I believe the headline I am going to use is one from the Denver Post from a few weeks ago: Gun debate locked and loaded. Witty headline writer is at it again. I really enjoy the punnery in the headline and it lends well to a single graphical image.

More examples of Bernhard’s work:


1913


A World War I German propaganda poster urging the sale of war bonds in the Plakastil style pioneered by Lucian Bernhard.


Lucian Bernhard, Priester Matches, 1909 by kitchener.lord on Flickr

The Priester Match poster is a watershed document of modern graphic design, or rather, proto-Modern design. Its composition is so stark and its colors so startling that it captures the viewer’s eye in an instant. Before 1906, when the poster first appeared on the streets of Berlin, persuasive simplicity was a rare thing in most advertising: posters, especially, tended to be wordy and ornate. No one had yet heard of its young creator, who, thanks to this poster, was to influence the genre of advertising known as the Sachplakat, or object poster.

Hail Bernhard the Magnificent

To be continued.

Will Blucifer’s 5th birthday be last at DIA?

Nuggets: Waiting for Superman

Booked up

Gun Debate Locked, Loaded

Mars Rover Drills Deep

Climbing price of fuel won’t shift into reverse soon

Northeast digs out after blizzard

Love your heart

Treating Addiction

Jack & Jill and The Fool On The Hill: Thumbnails (first)

Jack fell down
and broke his crown
But nobody wants to know him
Day after day, alone on the hill
and he never gives an answer

This is a rough idea of what might be able to be done with the provided dingbats for the first of the six narratives. Thumbnails will be made for all six, and probably posted here. A lot more work will be done in illustrator on the final one, including manipulating and dissecting the dingbats in much more detail than was done here, of course, but this is just a rough idea.

Jack and Jill and the Fool on the Hill (part 2)

So it turns out that I wasn’t completely clear on the assignment. We were not expected to make only one narrative out of the given lines from “Jack & Jill” and “Fool on the Hill”. Rather, we were meant to do six narratives with accompanying thumbnails, then one will be selected for a final to be presented – printed and matted.

The images will be contained in 6 4.5″ x 4.5″ squares on a black 15″ x 20″ board with 1.25″ horizontal gutters, a 1.5″ vertical gutter and 2.25″ vertical margins and 2″ horizontal margins.

Images will be made using provided dingbats file images.

Here are the six rewrites:

Jack fell down
and broke his crown
they can see he’s just a fool
but nobody wants to know him
day after day, alone on the hill
and he never gives an answer

Jack & Jill
went up the hill
but the fool on the hill
they can see he’s just a fool
but nobody wants to know him
and he never gives an answer

To fetch a pail of water
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and broke his crown
day after day, alone on the hill
they can see that he’s just a fool
and he never gives an answer (((or: but nobody wants to know him)))

Jack & Jill
went up the hill
day after day, alone on the hill
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and he never gives an answer
they can see his just a fool

Day after day, alone on the hill
they can see that he’s just fool
but nobody wants to know him
Jack & Jill
went up the hill
and broke his crown

Jack fell down
they can see that he’s just a fool
day after day, alone on the hill
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and he never gives an answer
but nobody wants to know him
(((alternatively swap the last two lines)))

The Function of the Response (when the response is a blog post)

Questions in response to The Function of the Studio (when the studio is a laptop) by Caitlin Jones.

What makes the studio so important to the artist? Is it a state of mind when in that studio?

I find that for me, that’s often exactly the case, although my “studio” doesn’t exist in the typical sense of the word. I would love to have a studio (and/or) an office. A place where I can go to work and be alone, cut off from everything distracting. But in a way, that’s cut off from everything inspiring. My studio would have to have a tv in it, something that many artists would scoff at. My studio would have to have music. My studio would have to sometimes have people in it.

Often, my studio is a coffee shop. Not just any coffee shop, but one I’ve grown to love since discovering it. It’s one of the few 24 hour coffee shops in Colorado, and no matter where in the state I live, I’d be willing to drive to it in the dead of night, when I can’t sleep and I can’t focus on the work that needs to be done. I’ve spent many a night writing, working on digital (and even  some traditional) art, sipping coffee or tea and breathing the ambiance of the little bookstore/coffee shop. There are never enough free tables, especially in November. There are never enough people who sit down at the piano and plink out a song or two. There are never enough hours in the day for me to spend as much time there as I’d like to.

My studio has also consisted of a multitude of classrooms, my coffee table (while a movie runs in the background or my fiancee plays a videogame), her parents’ basement, my mom’s kitchen table, and even my bed a few times when things need to get done, but I just don’t have it in me to face the day. The studio is where you create. It’s where your inspiration lives. It’s where your ability to get things done takes you.

How does the title relate to the article?

I felt like the article was important and relevant, but I felt like the concept of a studio got lost somewhere in the many and varied examples of contemporary and internet-based art. I’m not entirely sure that the title “The function of the studio,” was ever directly addressed.

Other things that stood out or were important to me.

I’m a very big proponent of the infinite universes theory, or quantum worlds, or quantum reality, or alternate universes or infinite possibility, or however you want to word it. I spend an extremely large amount of time thinking about this. Finding it here, where I wasn’t expecting it was sort of a kick to the gut.

“Every lie creates a parallel world; the world in which it’s true.” -Momus