Portfoliobox

I worked a little on my portfoliobox today and got some things up on society6. Nowhere near finished, but feeling productive.

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Printmaking: Artists working in Etching

Kenji Ushiku, born 1922. Japanese.

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HANA-12-L, ETCHING, 13 X 10
(found here)

tree etching
(found here)

Megan Corbett
(website)
thumb_China_rabbit

Megan Corbett has created a series of etchings printed on hand made paper and fired clay. The artists’ inspiration evolved from collecting sea weathered china fragments found on beaches around Northland, New Zealand. The collecting of these pieces has become something of a treasure hunt for Megan and she has researched this topic for some years.

The artist has recreated designs from found china fragments onto her own ceramic pieces and zinc etching plates. The purpose of the work is to draw attention to ceramic sherds as an historical fragment of New Zealand’s colonial history.

Madeline Adams

Madeline-Adams-OR124679
Madeline Adams
O,R,1,2,4,6,7,9 – AP, 2006
Etching/Drypoint, 9 x 14″, page: 11 x 15″

Madeline-Adams-blg57a
Bl,G,5,7,a, 2008
Etching/Drypoint, 4 x 9″

This isn’t an etching, it’s sharpie on paper, but I really like it:
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Layers, 2005
Sharpie on paper, 15 x 22″

I don’t know if this actually is an etching, but it looks like one. It’s the album cover for the band Mountains in their album “Etchings”.
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Samantha Pugsley

I reblogged a post Samantha Pugsley put up regarding her photography and body dysmorphia a little while ago (here). Today when I was looking into what I wanted to bring in for my theory Tuesday image, I started looking through more of her work. Here are some examples of some really moving work that encompass body and emotional disconnect and longing in a beautiful and expressive way from the artist’s flickr page.

Day 87 Alt

Day 87

Day 97

Day 88

Day 168

Day 157

Day 156

Day 130

Day 110

Day 108

Day 107 Extra

Day 105

The Microscopic Photography of Dr. Gary Greenberg

BLUE, ORANGE & PINK SAND GRAINS) The tip of a spiral shell has broken off and become a grain of sand. After being repeatedly tumbled by action of the surf this spiral sand grain has become opalescent in character. It is surrounded by bits of coral, shell, and volcanic material.

(MASK SAND) A single grain of sand from the island of Corsica, France, looks like a mask (magnification 150 times)

A slice through a fresh grape is seen using lighting that passed through the grape.

A slice through the same grape is seen using lighting that has reflected off the surface of the grape.

A small capillary in the lung is full of red blood cells seen in orange. The dark blue spaces are air sacs. The walls of these tiny sacs (alveoli) carry red blood cells close to the oxygen rich air sacs, which is where the red blood cells pick up oxygen and give off carbon dioxide.

A section of bone has been stained with fluorescent markers to illuminate areas of new bone formation. The row of cells at the bottom are bone-forming osteoblasts. The bright colors show where new bone has been formed.

All images courtesy of The Art of Science.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

A classmate came up to me today and asked how to seperate black and white onto two different images to print them out. We discussed trading white for light grey since the lab doesn’t have white, but I couldn’t figure out how to do what she wanted.

Enter the google machine.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

I won’t be using this for screenprinting any time soon, but it could be useful for other photographic or graphic work in the future.

Fractured Images: The Starn Brothers

In response to my proposal and my post about Justin Myer Staller’s work, I was recommended by my professor to look into the Starn Brothers and their work with fragmented images.

I was particularly interested in their work with trees because trees are a subject very close to my heart.


from Speak For The Tree



Structure of Thought 7″

Attracted to Light 1″
Above, from Gravity of Light, an installation using 45,000 watts of light to illuminate their giant photographs


Permanent installation in NYC subway.


Double Rembrandt with Steps, 1987

See more here, here, or via google.

You are what you eat.

If everything you said/did was written/painted on your body would you watch what you say/do? – smiles515

This seems like an interesting interpretation of identity, taking the spin of “what you do and say makes you who you are. I think I might be interested in recording myself for a day and writing everything I say on myself and photographing it. That’s only one piece, though. I wonder how I could space it out or make it more involved.

Reassembled

Justin Myer Staller
Assembled Plates
printed with Akua Intaglio Ink

“Marge” Twenty plates inked (bigger)
and reassembled into the full image.

“Bridge St.” Seven plates
assembled on the press bed.

Justin Myer Staller is a printmaker living in Philadelphia. He is an adjunct professor of printmaking at Arcadia University and is a member of Space 1026. Justin completed his BA from Penn State University and his MFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Information retrieved from: Akua

This is a really interesting technique to work with, particularly in a self portrait when talking about a fragmented identity. It might be interesting to do some experiments in this style with c-printing from a single negative onto multiple pieces of paper. I think I have some 8×10 left from last semester that I could work with if I shot a roll. Something to consider.