Photo tiles

pictiles4

Crunchy Betty has this great tutorial about making picture tiles. It uses mod podge, so it’s not archival, but they look really nice. There is a tutorial here, including how to hang them. Tutorial includes pictures.

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Printmaking: Artists working in Etching

Kenji Ushiku, born 1922. Japanese.

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HANA-12-L, ETCHING, 13 X 10
(found here)

tree etching
(found here)

Megan Corbett
(website)
thumb_China_rabbit

Megan Corbett has created a series of etchings printed on hand made paper and fired clay. The artists’ inspiration evolved from collecting sea weathered china fragments found on beaches around Northland, New Zealand. The collecting of these pieces has become something of a treasure hunt for Megan and she has researched this topic for some years.

The artist has recreated designs from found china fragments onto her own ceramic pieces and zinc etching plates. The purpose of the work is to draw attention to ceramic sherds as an historical fragment of New Zealand’s colonial history.

Madeline Adams

Madeline-Adams-OR124679
Madeline Adams
O,R,1,2,4,6,7,9 – AP, 2006
Etching/Drypoint, 9 x 14″, page: 11 x 15″

Madeline-Adams-blg57a
Bl,G,5,7,a, 2008
Etching/Drypoint, 4 x 9″

This isn’t an etching, it’s sharpie on paper, but I really like it:
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Layers, 2005
Sharpie on paper, 15 x 22″

I don’t know if this actually is an etching, but it looks like one. It’s the album cover for the band Mountains in their album “Etchings”.
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Body and Time

model-9-made-of-hair

Bill Fink makes portraits of people out of their hair.

Time and Matter Photography
Over thirty years ago I started developing what I now call Time and Matter Photography; pictures made entirely of nearly any material or matter. Unlike conventional photography using silver halide or inkjet, Time and Matter Photography creates a historical, collectible artifact that can posses the emotional, or spiritual based on the matter used. Pictures can be made entirely from the ashes of a loved one, hair, soil, or nearly any material. allowing ideas to be turned into photographic art that is defined in part by the material itself. – Bill Fink

ss191
(source)


Installation art by Christian Boltanski

More image stacking stuff.

I’m working on a skill share powerpoint to share image stacking, how I learned it and how I do it. (For stuff I’ve already posted about this, see this post). This post will include additional references on image stacking, focusing on star trail style stacking and images by other photographers.

Astrophotography: Star Photo Stacking by PKM (instructable)

I used Lincoln Harrison’s tutorials when building my own stacked images. I linked to that tutorial in the first post. His flickr is here and has even more amazing images.
From Petapixel:

Photographer Lincoln Harrison captures jaw-dropping photographs of star trails. Shooting from the Australian outback, he spends up to 15 hours creating each image of the night sky. Shooting with a Nikon D7000, Nikon D3100, and a wide assortment of lenses, Harrison captures a large number of exposures of the foreground and stars separately. He then combines the images (sometimes hundreds of them) into amazing photographs showing the sky dominated by colorful star trails.

Further browsing Petapixel turned up photographer Ben Canales (see Zhang’s Petapixel article on him here) who also does stacks of stars. His website is here and a tutorial video he did about his workflow is here.

Example of Grant Kaye’s star trail photography can be found here.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

A classmate came up to me today and asked how to seperate black and white onto two different images to print them out. We discussed trading white for light grey since the lab doesn’t have white, but I couldn’t figure out how to do what she wanted.

Enter the google machine.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

I won’t be using this for screenprinting any time soon, but it could be useful for other photographic or graphic work in the future.

Chemigrams

I had the privilege of sitting in on Denis Roussel‘s photo I class for a session yesterday. His class was doing Chemigrams, something Denis hadn’t covered in the alternative processes class I took with him last semester. He caught up with me in the darkroom yesterday when I was adding cyanotype to this print and asked me to sit in and learn about chemigrams.

He did a quick lecture with resources to other artists working with chemigrams and gave us some references of images along with a tutorial. The how-to can be found here on alternativephotography.com (a great resource for anyone working in alt processes.

Here’s a basic rundown of the process, as written by Christina Z. Anderson:

The chemigram process was discovered by Pierre Cordier on November 10, 1956. It is a unique process that uses resists on photographic paper much the same way as wax is used as a resist in batik.

What Cordier discovered in 1956 was that a resist can hold back the chemical effects of developer and fixer on black and white photo paper for a time. Paper put into developer that has been exposed to normal room light for varying periods of time will turn black, except where a resist blocks the chemical reaction. The parts of the paper protected by the resist will continue to change color from extended exposure to room light, of course.

Likewise, paper put into fixer turns white, except where a resist blocks the chemical reaction. The parts of the paper protected by the resist continue to change color from the room light exposure, and suddenly there is the possibility of black, white, and colors in-between on normally monochrome paper.

With a back and forth from developer to fixer or fixer to developer, the resist begins to dissolve, so the next chemical bath either turns slowly exposing paper under the dissolving resist black (developer) or white (fixer) or some color in-between because of the now-lengthening room light exposure. With time this dissolution can be coaxed into creating beautiful, intricate patterns.

The chemigram process is actually very simple, using common household ingredients and common darkroom chemistry. There is no end to experimentation with this nonfigurative, physico-chemical process.

There are some great photos up there. I’ll put the ones I liked best here.


Chemigram by Cynthia Huber, handcoloured


Chemigram by Cynthia Huber, handcoloured


Chemigram by Cynthia Huber: stencils, coconut oil, varnish, sprays on both fixer and developer.


Chemigram by Patrick Rooney done with nail polish and then put through a mordancage solution.


Chemigram by Clare Parsons. “Face” is butter resist and then chemigram is mordancaged.

He also linked us to some work by Heather Oelklaus

These are my two chemigram experiments:

Photoshop image stacking

This technique can be used in a lot of ways to communicate fracture, motion, time lapse and distortion from multiple images into a single image. Some examples:


Smeared Skies made from hundreds of stacked photographs by Matt Molloy


(Matt Molloy)
Time Collapse: How time-lapse photography led to turning stacks of frames into a single image
Molloy talks about his process with stacking. He uses an automated script to stack his photos (called advanced stacker (more about advanced stacker here) and applies lightening techniques usually employed with star trail photography like the tutorial here talks about. See photos here and here

I found this process while trying to remember something I wrote about in response reading [Lucy Soutter, “The Collapsed Archive: Idris Khan,” review of Idris Khan at Victoria Miro Gallery, London, Source, no. 49 (Winter 2006): 46-47.] (I wrote about this here in August 2011. I guess this imagery really stayed with me. was also, very specifically thinking about Bernd and Hilla Becher’s typologies that Khan collapsed into a single image.

Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Gable Side Houses 2004
Photogrphic print 208 x 160 cm

Since 1959 Bernd and Hilla Becher have been photographing industrial structures that exemplify modernist engineering, such as gas reservoirs and water towers. Their photogrphs are often presented in groups of similar design; their repreated images make these everyday buildings seem stragely imposing and alien. Idris khan’s Every… Bernd And Gilla Becher series appropriates the Bechers’ imagery and compiles their collections into sing super-images. Inthis piece, multiple images of American-single gabled houses are digitally layered and super-imposed giving the effect of an impressionistic drawing or blurred film still. (source)


<p align right="Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholders 2004
Photographic print 208 x 160cm

The structure in the Bechers’ original photographs are almost identical, though in Khan’s hands the images’ contrast and opacity is adjusted to ensure each layer can be seen and has presence. Though Kahn works in mechanised media and his images are of industrial subjects, their effect is of a soft ethereal energy. They exude a transfixing spiritual quality in their densely compacted details and ghostly outlines. … Prison Type Gasholders conveys a sense of time depiicted in motion, as if transporting the old building, in its obsolete black and white format, into the extreme future. (source)</a

Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Spherical type Gasholders 2004
Photographic print 208 x 160cm

The Bechers took their photos as a means to document a disappearing tradition;
by grouping them according to ‘typology’ the buildings’ designs function like archetypal symbols or an architectural language. Through Khan’s translucent aggregations, structures such as ….Spherical Type Gasholders lose their commanding simplicity and rigid formalism and descend into fractured and gestural blurs. Through his photographs Khan compresses the timelind of repetition into indivisible subsuming moments and creates a poetic mutability from the fixed codes of history. (source)</a

Identity and the self portrait

I have to do an assignment on “identity” for printmaking. I’ve been thinking a lot about what that means to me since I started working with found photographs in my alternative photographic processes class last semester. I want to work with old photos of myself as a child, juxtaposed with new photographs of myself now, to talk about how I’ve changed as a person but am still struggling to identify with the body I live in. I’m sure I’ll have more to say after I finish doing my reading for my printmaking class and get some ideas out of that, but I wanted to talk about my ideas for what I might do for my first photo project for photo 4 this semester. 

I was thinking about using masks. I worked with masks some last semester when I was making tintypes:

I included the third one because it gives me interesting ideas about how I can incorporate the masks with reflections of myself or my face either in other masks or out of masks to talk about how the mask is a part of my identity or how it hides parts of my identity. Neither of those masks are of my original design and were for costumes. Costuming has been a huge part of my life and really is a part of my identity. I feel strangely more comfortable in costumes being someone else than I do as “myself”. I have trouble identifying with a “self” particularly as it relates to my physical body, but also as it relates to a personal identity. I always have trouble with “tell me one thing about yourself” introductions because I can’t think of anything that’s uniquely me. Maybe that’s normal, but it’s part of the problem.

I decided to look up some other art that people have done as non-standard self portraits. Some of what I found was photographic, some wasn’t.


The Dream Children’ from The Hypnagogia Series by Kalliope Amorphous

Found via this amazing post that talks about Kalliope Amorphus’ work: Kalliope Amorphous Visualizes Identity, Gender And Archetypes


Self Portrait l Identity 2 l by shaikhdanial

The left shows a traditional self portrait, but the right shows it shattered and fragmented, which really speaks to how I feel about my own self identity. This could be done in photography either by digital manipulation or possibly with the use of mirrors angled away from a camera or with the camera behind the subject (me) in some way, supported by a tripod. Ideally, the easiest way to shoot something like this might be with a 4×5 because you can angle the camera down and shift it out of the line of sight of the mirrors. I never got fantastic with tilt/shift, but it might be worth playing with again sometime.



Self Portrait by Nathaniel Wolfe

From the artist:

This mosaic portrait is composed of 3000 images from various angles from the front of my head, and then organized to recreate an image of the back of my head. The 30″ by 30″ portrait pokes fun at visual perception and identity, as we’re “a sum of all our parts.”


Identity Self Portrait 2011
by symons-photography

This talks to me about not identifying with the self, with the face, specifically, which is the center of the self for most people, and not something I identify with, on my own. It’s done via long-exposure, which is something I began experimenting with more last semester.


Camouflage Self-Portrait (RED)

Andy Warhol, synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen on canvas, 1986

Using a projector to distort parts of myself is another really interesting idea that I might try exploring. Also painting my face/body with some kind of body paint to change the way it looks. I’ve considered wearing clothing that has additional body parts attached that distort the way my body looks – not necessarily into something I identify with, but into something monsterous or disturbing or abnormal to communicate how I feel about my own body and my distorted sense of self.

This is just a start, a place to brainstorm ideas going forward.

Transformation: Infographic to Website

So the goal here is to turn my finished infographic into a website with 3-4 internal functional links, external links to information, etc. It needs to be created in photoshop, migrated to dreamweaver and be based on a grid system. Architectural system is due Wednesday.

I’m doing research here based on other people’s well-designed websites for inspiration.


Pound and Grain
(Found here: 25 well designed websites)



(found here:
41 colorful & well designed websites)


lost world’s fairs
(found here: 41 colorful & well designed websites)

More forthcoming.