I was looking up more microscope photography for a new body of monotype work, and came across these:

Eckhard Völcker – Exploring the Microscopic World

More here

I also really dig this photo of microscopic soy sauce

via the blaze

And these: Microscopic Images of Alcoholic Drinks

via insanetwist


Vodka


Red Wine



The above photos by photographer Michael John Grist (website) during his haikyo trip to Nara Dreamland, an abandoned amusement park in Japan. Haikyo (Japanese for “ruins”) is the hobby of urban exploration, which often includes trips to abandoned places and nearly always includes people photographing their experiences.

I was particularly drawn to these images because they were at once formally beautiful, but also emotionally evocative. They are haunting images of a constructed reality that was enjoyed, then abandoned. I saw these awhile back, but I was recently reminded of them when I was trying to think of other artists that work in capturing constructed realities.

Printmaking: Artists working in Etching

Kenji Ushiku, born 1922. Japanese.

440_artwork_file_1217621947
HANA-12-L, ETCHING, 13 X 10
(found here)

tree etching
(found here)

Megan Corbett
(website)
thumb_China_rabbit

Megan Corbett has created a series of etchings printed on hand made paper and fired clay. The artists’ inspiration evolved from collecting sea weathered china fragments found on beaches around Northland, New Zealand. The collecting of these pieces has become something of a treasure hunt for Megan and she has researched this topic for some years.

The artist has recreated designs from found china fragments onto her own ceramic pieces and zinc etching plates. The purpose of the work is to draw attention to ceramic sherds as an historical fragment of New Zealand’s colonial history.

Madeline Adams

Madeline-Adams-OR124679
Madeline Adams
O,R,1,2,4,6,7,9 – AP, 2006
Etching/Drypoint, 9 x 14″, page: 11 x 15″

Madeline-Adams-blg57a
Bl,G,5,7,a, 2008
Etching/Drypoint, 4 x 9″

This isn’t an etching, it’s sharpie on paper, but I really like it:
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Layers, 2005
Sharpie on paper, 15 x 22″

I don’t know if this actually is an etching, but it looks like one. It’s the album cover for the band Mountains in their album “Etchings”.
adf8b82e

Body and Time

model-9-made-of-hair

Bill Fink makes portraits of people out of their hair.

Time and Matter Photography
Over thirty years ago I started developing what I now call Time and Matter Photography; pictures made entirely of nearly any material or matter. Unlike conventional photography using silver halide or inkjet, Time and Matter Photography creates a historical, collectible artifact that can posses the emotional, or spiritual based on the matter used. Pictures can be made entirely from the ashes of a loved one, hair, soil, or nearly any material. allowing ideas to be turned into photographic art that is defined in part by the material itself. – Bill Fink

ss191
(source)


Installation art by Christian Boltanski

More image stacking stuff.

I’m working on a skill share powerpoint to share image stacking, how I learned it and how I do it. (For stuff I’ve already posted about this, see this post). This post will include additional references on image stacking, focusing on star trail style stacking and images by other photographers.

Astrophotography: Star Photo Stacking by PKM (instructable)

I used Lincoln Harrison’s tutorials when building my own stacked images. I linked to that tutorial in the first post. His flickr is here and has even more amazing images.
From Petapixel:

Photographer Lincoln Harrison captures jaw-dropping photographs of star trails. Shooting from the Australian outback, he spends up to 15 hours creating each image of the night sky. Shooting with a Nikon D7000, Nikon D3100, and a wide assortment of lenses, Harrison captures a large number of exposures of the foreground and stars separately. He then combines the images (sometimes hundreds of them) into amazing photographs showing the sky dominated by colorful star trails.

Further browsing Petapixel turned up photographer Ben Canales (see Zhang’s Petapixel article on him here) who also does stacks of stars. His website is here and a tutorial video he did about his workflow is here.

Example of Grant Kaye’s star trail photography can be found here.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

A classmate came up to me today and asked how to seperate black and white onto two different images to print them out. We discussed trading white for light grey since the lab doesn’t have white, but I couldn’t figure out how to do what she wanted.

Enter the google machine.

Using Photoshop Threshold to Separate Colors for Screenprint

I won’t be using this for screenprinting any time soon, but it could be useful for other photographic or graphic work in the future.

Fractured Images: The Starn Brothers

In response to my proposal and my post about Justin Myer Staller’s work, I was recommended by my professor to look into the Starn Brothers and their work with fragmented images.

I was particularly interested in their work with trees because trees are a subject very close to my heart.


from Speak For The Tree



Structure of Thought 7″

Attracted to Light 1″
Above, from Gravity of Light, an installation using 45,000 watts of light to illuminate their giant photographs


Permanent installation in NYC subway.


Double Rembrandt with Steps, 1987

See more here, here, or via google.

Initial Proposal I: identity and body (un)recognition

I intend to photograph myself using long exposure blurring, in masks and possibly costumes to talk about how I don’t connect to my own face and body. I am also considering building composite images out of several photographs layered together in photoshop. We’ll see how it goes as I continue to shoot and evaluate the photographs. The work will discuss my identity and self recognition, with particular attention to my dissociation from my body as being representative of my self and my identity.

I’ve been investigating various other photographers during my look into this work and their work with identity. One of them I brought in for Theory Tuesday (February 4th) – Justin Myer Staller’s work with individual plates in printmaking that combined to create one image. Although I don’t think I’ll be using that particular process for this project, I may use it in a future body of work that also deals with fragmented identity and body history.

Matt Molloy works with photo stacking and his approach to distortion via time lapse is something I’m considering working with, as well. Several photos are taken (30-100) from the same angle, while one subject in the photograph (me) moves. Then those images are stacked and a composite image is produced. I came across Molloy’s work while trying to recall the work of Idris Khan and his stacking of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s typologies. I have examples in my blog of all of these bodies of work.

https://sylladex.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/photoshop-image-stacking/
https://sylladex.wordpress.com/2014/01/26/reassembled/

I have tutorials posted there, as well. I’ve tried image stacking before and wasn’t able to get a look that I liked or really figure it out technically. I didn’t look up ways that other people were doing it before, so I’ve done that now so that I can work more solidly on a final composite image if I decide to go that route.