Body and Time

model-9-made-of-hair

Bill Fink makes portraits of people out of their hair.

Time and Matter Photography
Over thirty years ago I started developing what I now call Time and Matter Photography; pictures made entirely of nearly any material or matter. Unlike conventional photography using silver halide or inkjet, Time and Matter Photography creates a historical, collectible artifact that can posses the emotional, or spiritual based on the matter used. Pictures can be made entirely from the ashes of a loved one, hair, soil, or nearly any material. allowing ideas to be turned into photographic art that is defined in part by the material itself. – Bill Fink

ss191
(source)


Installation art by Christian Boltanski

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Identity and the self portrait

I have to do an assignment on “identity” for printmaking. I’ve been thinking a lot about what that means to me since I started working with found photographs in my alternative photographic processes class last semester. I want to work with old photos of myself as a child, juxtaposed with new photographs of myself now, to talk about how I’ve changed as a person but am still struggling to identify with the body I live in. I’m sure I’ll have more to say after I finish doing my reading for my printmaking class and get some ideas out of that, but I wanted to talk about my ideas for what I might do for my first photo project for photo 4 this semester. 

I was thinking about using masks. I worked with masks some last semester when I was making tintypes:

I included the third one because it gives me interesting ideas about how I can incorporate the masks with reflections of myself or my face either in other masks or out of masks to talk about how the mask is a part of my identity or how it hides parts of my identity. Neither of those masks are of my original design and were for costumes. Costuming has been a huge part of my life and really is a part of my identity. I feel strangely more comfortable in costumes being someone else than I do as “myself”. I have trouble identifying with a “self” particularly as it relates to my physical body, but also as it relates to a personal identity. I always have trouble with “tell me one thing about yourself” introductions because I can’t think of anything that’s uniquely me. Maybe that’s normal, but it’s part of the problem.

I decided to look up some other art that people have done as non-standard self portraits. Some of what I found was photographic, some wasn’t.


The Dream Children’ from The Hypnagogia Series by Kalliope Amorphous

Found via this amazing post that talks about Kalliope Amorphus’ work: Kalliope Amorphous Visualizes Identity, Gender And Archetypes


Self Portrait l Identity 2 l by shaikhdanial

The left shows a traditional self portrait, but the right shows it shattered and fragmented, which really speaks to how I feel about my own self identity. This could be done in photography either by digital manipulation or possibly with the use of mirrors angled away from a camera or with the camera behind the subject (me) in some way, supported by a tripod. Ideally, the easiest way to shoot something like this might be with a 4×5 because you can angle the camera down and shift it out of the line of sight of the mirrors. I never got fantastic with tilt/shift, but it might be worth playing with again sometime.



Self Portrait by Nathaniel Wolfe

From the artist:

This mosaic portrait is composed of 3000 images from various angles from the front of my head, and then organized to recreate an image of the back of my head. The 30″ by 30″ portrait pokes fun at visual perception and identity, as we’re “a sum of all our parts.”


Identity Self Portrait 2011
by symons-photography

This talks to me about not identifying with the self, with the face, specifically, which is the center of the self for most people, and not something I identify with, on my own. It’s done via long-exposure, which is something I began experimenting with more last semester.


Camouflage Self-Portrait (RED)

Andy Warhol, synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen on canvas, 1986

Using a projector to distort parts of myself is another really interesting idea that I might try exploring. Also painting my face/body with some kind of body paint to change the way it looks. I’ve considered wearing clothing that has additional body parts attached that distort the way my body looks – not necessarily into something I identify with, but into something monsterous or disturbing or abnormal to communicate how I feel about my own body and my distorted sense of self.

This is just a start, a place to brainstorm ideas going forward.

Printmaking: Reduction cuts

Tonight, I worked on printmaking homework. My first assignment is to work on practice cuts to explore ways of using the printmaking tools. I knew right away that I wanted to do some trees, but I also made a lot of experimental lines, too. 

I looked at some example cuts and advice online. 

Here is Jodie Hurt’s fish, that I really liked:

 

I also found this nice step-by-step on how to transfer a drawing to a linoleum block because it’s been awhile since I’ve done it and I couldn’t remember if there was anything special I needed to do to make it happen.

Since I wanted to work on trees, I decided to google search “Aspen tree prints” to get an idea of how an actual tree would transfer into a print or drawing style with little shading. I found this beautiful print on etsy that I really liked:

And here’s my work as of about an hour ago, including the sketch:

9 eyes

Assignment – Draw 9 eyes.

This is a post where I gather references for different types of eyes. They will be referenced if at all possible and I will try to pull from a variety of styles. Some of these will probably be printed for my reference book.


Andrew Hussie. Nepeta: Give Tavros the bad news. (MSPaint Adventures : Homestuck). Digital, photoshop. 650px × 450px, .gif image. July 5, 2010.


Andrew Husse. Jane: Check window. (MSPaint Adventures : Homestuck). Digital, Photoshop. 650px × 450px, .gif image. November 23, 2011.


red-kimchi. runawaystuck!dave. Digital. 450px × 600px, .png image. December 26, 2011


Michelle Haglund. Gerard WIP. Colored Pencil. Digital dimensions: 2700 x 1861. Physical dimensions: 71cm × 49cm. July 23, 2011.


Si Scott. Silent Studios / Resonate. Animal_series 01. Art Direction, Design & Illustration by Si Scott. Pen on paper.


The only source I have for these is shooshsickle. I have no idea if that’s the original artist or not, since that’s a roleplay blog. If anyone could point me in the direction of some official credit, I’d really appreciate it.


Reanon. Goat eye -stock. Digital photography. 1100×960, .jpg image. November 9, 2009

Now the above obviously isn’t 9 eyes. One of the eyes I drew was mine (required) and one was just freehanded, creatively and embellished.
Now I have to clean off the table and working on touching up my exquisite corpse that I was assigned to touch up.

Speaking of which, something that might be good for my reference book would be this:


Cadavre exquis by Man Ray, Joan Miró, Max Morise and Yves Tanguy
(found on the wikipedia article for exquisite corpse)

or this, which has all the required information for my resource book, but I don’t like as much visually.


Nude. Cadavre Exquis (French) with Yves Tanguy (American, born France. 1900-1955), Joan Miró (Spanish, 1893-1983), Max Morise (French, 1900-1973) and Man Ray (American, 1890-1976)
(1926-27). Composite drawing of ink, pencil, and colored pencil on paper, 14 1/8 x 9″ (35.9 x 22.9 cm).
(found at

Texture Experiment : Reblog

While searching for backgrounds for my cards (specifically the “bubble” card – raw image here), I came across an interesting texture experiment that turned into a beautiful swirled art piece. I was also interested in the things that inspired her, so check those out when you go to look at her blog post (the following image is sized down. Click here for the full size or go to her blog post


Amy CrookHer inspirations were also beautiful – there was this piece:


Charles Holbert Jr. (“KidNotorious” on deviant art)
(da account, other Jack-related pieces)

And this interesting art installation series by Kirsty Hall called 365 Jars

“Every day during 2011, Bristol artist Kirsty Hall will go for a walk to release an art jar into the wild for people to find and keep.”

There are some interesting jars, but the photos of the locations and the way the jars are tucked away are far more beautiful to me. I also like the idea of something going out into the wild that people can either search for or stumble upon and keep. It’s like finding a little treasure. Reminds me a little of Geocaching.

It also reminded me of some art I made back in my first semester as an art student in 2-D design:


The Eternal DiveDone for my 2-D Design class – The assignment was to create a variety of lines using sumi ink and various brushes and invented drawing tools to create various lines. Later, we were to cut out the lines and paste them into specific compositions.

The second portion of the assignment was to trace the five line composition, grid the paper, and then fill each section with a different line pattern.

The image can also be viewed on my dA account here (interested parties may also purchase a print of this piece there).

Edit: I’ve finished the Bubble Card using the background from the Jack Skellington piece (shown above). I had to combine layers to remove Jack’s head and I’m pretty happy with how it turned out.