More image stacking stuff.

I’m working on a skill share powerpoint to share image stacking, how I learned it and how I do it. (For stuff I’ve already posted about this, see this post). This post will include additional references on image stacking, focusing on star trail style stacking and images by other photographers.

Astrophotography: Star Photo Stacking by PKM (instructable)

I used Lincoln Harrison’s tutorials when building my own stacked images. I linked to that tutorial in the first post. His flickr is here and has even more amazing images.
From Petapixel:

Photographer Lincoln Harrison captures jaw-dropping photographs of star trails. Shooting from the Australian outback, he spends up to 15 hours creating each image of the night sky. Shooting with a Nikon D7000, Nikon D3100, and a wide assortment of lenses, Harrison captures a large number of exposures of the foreground and stars separately. He then combines the images (sometimes hundreds of them) into amazing photographs showing the sky dominated by colorful star trails.

Further browsing Petapixel turned up photographer Ben Canales (see Zhang’s Petapixel article on him here) who also does stacks of stars. His website is here and a tutorial video he did about his workflow is here.

Example of Grant Kaye’s star trail photography can be found here.

Photoshop image stacking

This technique can be used in a lot of ways to communicate fracture, motion, time lapse and distortion from multiple images into a single image. Some examples:


Smeared Skies made from hundreds of stacked photographs by Matt Molloy


(Matt Molloy)
Time Collapse: How time-lapse photography led to turning stacks of frames into a single image
Molloy talks about his process with stacking. He uses an automated script to stack his photos (called advanced stacker (more about advanced stacker here) and applies lightening techniques usually employed with star trail photography like the tutorial here talks about. See photos here and here

I found this process while trying to remember something I wrote about in response reading [Lucy Soutter, “The Collapsed Archive: Idris Khan,” review of Idris Khan at Victoria Miro Gallery, London, Source, no. 49 (Winter 2006): 46-47.] (I wrote about this here in August 2011. I guess this imagery really stayed with me. was also, very specifically thinking about Bernd and Hilla Becher’s typologies that Khan collapsed into a single image.

Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Gable Side Houses 2004
Photogrphic print 208 x 160 cm

Since 1959 Bernd and Hilla Becher have been photographing industrial structures that exemplify modernist engineering, such as gas reservoirs and water towers. Their photogrphs are often presented in groups of similar design; their repreated images make these everyday buildings seem stragely imposing and alien. Idris khan’s Every… Bernd And Gilla Becher series appropriates the Bechers’ imagery and compiles their collections into sing super-images. Inthis piece, multiple images of American-single gabled houses are digitally layered and super-imposed giving the effect of an impressionistic drawing or blurred film still. (source)


<p align right="Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholders 2004
Photographic print 208 x 160cm

The structure in the Bechers’ original photographs are almost identical, though in Khan’s hands the images’ contrast and opacity is adjusted to ensure each layer can be seen and has presence. Though Kahn works in mechanised media and his images are of industrial subjects, their effect is of a soft ethereal energy. They exude a transfixing spiritual quality in their densely compacted details and ghostly outlines. … Prison Type Gasholders conveys a sense of time depiicted in motion, as if transporting the old building, in its obsolete black and white format, into the extreme future. (source)</a

Every… Bernd And Hilla Becher Spherical type Gasholders 2004
Photographic print 208 x 160cm

The Bechers took their photos as a means to document a disappearing tradition;
by grouping them according to ‘typology’ the buildings’ designs function like archetypal symbols or an architectural language. Through Khan’s translucent aggregations, structures such as ….Spherical Type Gasholders lose their commanding simplicity and rigid formalism and descend into fractured and gestural blurs. Through his photographs Khan compresses the timelind of repetition into indivisible subsuming moments and creates a poetic mutability from the fixed codes of history. (source)</a

Identity and the self portrait

I have to do an assignment on “identity” for printmaking. I’ve been thinking a lot about what that means to me since I started working with found photographs in my alternative photographic processes class last semester. I want to work with old photos of myself as a child, juxtaposed with new photographs of myself now, to talk about how I’ve changed as a person but am still struggling to identify with the body I live in. I’m sure I’ll have more to say after I finish doing my reading for my printmaking class and get some ideas out of that, but I wanted to talk about my ideas for what I might do for my first photo project for photo 4 this semester. 

I was thinking about using masks. I worked with masks some last semester when I was making tintypes:

I included the third one because it gives me interesting ideas about how I can incorporate the masks with reflections of myself or my face either in other masks or out of masks to talk about how the mask is a part of my identity or how it hides parts of my identity. Neither of those masks are of my original design and were for costumes. Costuming has been a huge part of my life and really is a part of my identity. I feel strangely more comfortable in costumes being someone else than I do as “myself”. I have trouble identifying with a “self” particularly as it relates to my physical body, but also as it relates to a personal identity. I always have trouble with “tell me one thing about yourself” introductions because I can’t think of anything that’s uniquely me. Maybe that’s normal, but it’s part of the problem.

I decided to look up some other art that people have done as non-standard self portraits. Some of what I found was photographic, some wasn’t.


The Dream Children’ from The Hypnagogia Series by Kalliope Amorphous

Found via this amazing post that talks about Kalliope Amorphus’ work: Kalliope Amorphous Visualizes Identity, Gender And Archetypes


Self Portrait l Identity 2 l by shaikhdanial

The left shows a traditional self portrait, but the right shows it shattered and fragmented, which really speaks to how I feel about my own self identity. This could be done in photography either by digital manipulation or possibly with the use of mirrors angled away from a camera or with the camera behind the subject (me) in some way, supported by a tripod. Ideally, the easiest way to shoot something like this might be with a 4×5 because you can angle the camera down and shift it out of the line of sight of the mirrors. I never got fantastic with tilt/shift, but it might be worth playing with again sometime.



Self Portrait by Nathaniel Wolfe

From the artist:

This mosaic portrait is composed of 3000 images from various angles from the front of my head, and then organized to recreate an image of the back of my head. The 30″ by 30″ portrait pokes fun at visual perception and identity, as we’re “a sum of all our parts.”


Identity Self Portrait 2011
by symons-photography

This talks to me about not identifying with the self, with the face, specifically, which is the center of the self for most people, and not something I identify with, on my own. It’s done via long-exposure, which is something I began experimenting with more last semester.


Camouflage Self-Portrait (RED)

Andy Warhol, synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen on canvas, 1986

Using a projector to distort parts of myself is another really interesting idea that I might try exploring. Also painting my face/body with some kind of body paint to change the way it looks. I’ve considered wearing clothing that has additional body parts attached that distort the way my body looks – not necessarily into something I identify with, but into something monsterous or disturbing or abnormal to communicate how I feel about my own body and my distorted sense of self.

This is just a start, a place to brainstorm ideas going forward.

Drunk Driving (How can the dismal statistics be improved?)

An Infographic for Design Media, 2013

Jack & Jill and The Fool On The Hill: Thumbnails (first)

Jack fell down
and broke his crown
But nobody wants to know him
Day after day, alone on the hill
and he never gives an answer

This is a rough idea of what might be able to be done with the provided dingbats for the first of the six narratives. Thumbnails will be made for all six, and probably posted here. A lot more work will be done in illustrator on the final one, including manipulating and dissecting the dingbats in much more detail than was done here, of course, but this is just a rough idea.

Jack and Jill and the Fool on the Hill (part 2)

So it turns out that I wasn’t completely clear on the assignment. We were not expected to make only one narrative out of the given lines from “Jack & Jill” and “Fool on the Hill”. Rather, we were meant to do six narratives with accompanying thumbnails, then one will be selected for a final to be presented – printed and matted.

The images will be contained in 6 4.5″ x 4.5″ squares on a black 15″ x 20″ board with 1.25″ horizontal gutters, a 1.5″ vertical gutter and 2.25″ vertical margins and 2″ horizontal margins.

Images will be made using provided dingbats file images.

Here are the six rewrites:

Jack fell down
and broke his crown
they can see he’s just a fool
but nobody wants to know him
day after day, alone on the hill
and he never gives an answer

Jack & Jill
went up the hill
but the fool on the hill
they can see he’s just a fool
but nobody wants to know him
and he never gives an answer

To fetch a pail of water
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and broke his crown
day after day, alone on the hill
they can see that he’s just a fool
and he never gives an answer (((or: but nobody wants to know him)))

Jack & Jill
went up the hill
day after day, alone on the hill
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and he never gives an answer
they can see his just a fool

Day after day, alone on the hill
they can see that he’s just fool
but nobody wants to know him
Jack & Jill
went up the hill
and broke his crown

Jack fell down
they can see that he’s just a fool
day after day, alone on the hill
the man with the foolish grin is keeping perfectly still
and he never gives an answer
but nobody wants to know him
(((alternatively swap the last two lines)))

9 eyes

Assignment – Draw 9 eyes.

This is a post where I gather references for different types of eyes. They will be referenced if at all possible and I will try to pull from a variety of styles. Some of these will probably be printed for my reference book.


Andrew Hussie. Nepeta: Give Tavros the bad news. (MSPaint Adventures : Homestuck). Digital, photoshop. 650px × 450px, .gif image. July 5, 2010.


Andrew Husse. Jane: Check window. (MSPaint Adventures : Homestuck). Digital, Photoshop. 650px × 450px, .gif image. November 23, 2011.


red-kimchi. runawaystuck!dave. Digital. 450px × 600px, .png image. December 26, 2011


Michelle Haglund. Gerard WIP. Colored Pencil. Digital dimensions: 2700 x 1861. Physical dimensions: 71cm × 49cm. July 23, 2011.


Si Scott. Silent Studios / Resonate. Animal_series 01. Art Direction, Design & Illustration by Si Scott. Pen on paper.


The only source I have for these is shooshsickle. I have no idea if that’s the original artist or not, since that’s a roleplay blog. If anyone could point me in the direction of some official credit, I’d really appreciate it.


Reanon. Goat eye -stock. Digital photography. 1100×960, .jpg image. November 9, 2009

Now the above obviously isn’t 9 eyes. One of the eyes I drew was mine (required) and one was just freehanded, creatively and embellished.
Now I have to clean off the table and working on touching up my exquisite corpse that I was assigned to touch up.

Speaking of which, something that might be good for my reference book would be this:


Cadavre exquis by Man Ray, Joan Miró, Max Morise and Yves Tanguy
(found on the wikipedia article for exquisite corpse)

or this, which has all the required information for my resource book, but I don’t like as much visually.


Nude. Cadavre Exquis (French) with Yves Tanguy (American, born France. 1900-1955), Joan Miró (Spanish, 1893-1983), Max Morise (French, 1900-1973) and Man Ray (American, 1890-1976)
(1926-27). Composite drawing of ink, pencil, and colored pencil on paper, 14 1/8 x 9″ (35.9 x 22.9 cm).
(found at

Cards 01-04

As per my proposal I’ve begun making cards.

I’ve run into some interesting problems with the images – namely than many of them are .gif and .png files which feature the characters with no backgrounds. A lot of what I’m using is cleaned up cahracter artwork, rather than in-game renders, and even if they are renders, they don’t have backgrounds. The cards looked too boring and plain on white backgrounds and didn’t look like a finished product, so I’ve begun making my own backgrounds. The first one is noticeably different from the second as I found ways to better integrate the images into the backgrounds so they don’t look so much like they’re just pasted onto a background – this is especially difficult when I’m working with photographic backgrounds and drawn artwork, but I think they look pretty good and I’m happy with them.

 

I chose to use “sylladex” as the © name because I didn’t want to put my legal name on them in case I want to share them with people on the internet, so I went with my blog username.